Orlando Takes Action On Key Issues

posted in: Issues | 0

Transparency

icon-trans-75Orlando Sanchez has made your Harris County government more transparent. As the elected official who oversees the payment of all expenditures made in the county, he wants you to know how your tax dollars are being spent. He has a created an award-winning website that allows anyone to see exactly what payments have been made—instantly. Under his leadership, Harris County has received major awards for the transparency of its financial data to taxpayers.

During his next term he will make that data even more transparent by adding a new feature that will make all payments searchable using different criteria—such as payee name, type of payment and more.

Credit Interest Swaps

icon-credit-swap-75Credit Interest Swaps (CIS) are agreements based on principle amounts that are supposed to help curb the risk associated with the cost of borrowing.

Municipalities and Counties all over the country used this financial tactic when issuing bonds with fluctuating interest rates and then entered into derivative contracts with banks to protect themselves against the rising cost of borrowing.

In 2008 the banking industry crisis led to a credit market turmoil that ultimately caused the cost of the derivative deals to rise and cost tax-payers across the country millions of dollars.

Currently, the Harris County Toll Road Authority is invested in Credit Interest Swaps (CIS) that are costing toll road users money through rate increases. Orlando Sanchez continues to fight for toll road users by looking for ways for the county to get the Toll Road Authority out of these agreements and thereby to save the county millions of dollars.

Fiscal Responsibility

icon-pig-75Since taking office in January of 2007, Orlando has kept his budget static while the budgets of other offices doing similar business have risen. In fact, according to public records, he has actually decreased the spending of his office by 1%. In Dallas County, the Treasurer’s Office has increased its spending by 4% in that same time; Jefferson County increased 61% and Williamson County 80%.

The City of Houston’s Office of the Controller, which performs similar functions for the City, increased spending by 32% between 2007 and 2014.


Office20072014% Inc/Dec
Harris County Treasurer1,115,8761,100,000-1.42%
Dallas County Treasurer1,116,5881,160,356+3.92%
Jefferson County Treasurer227,162364,587+60.50%
Williamson County Treasurer278,663502,630+80.37%
City of Houston Controller6,346,6758,397,862+32.32%

Sources

Harris County Budgets FY 2007-2008 Departments pg 162
Harris County Adopted GF Budget 2014-15 Plus Mobility
Dallas County FY 2007 Budget Detail pg 58
Dallas County FY 2014 Budget Detail pg 58
Jefferson County Annual Budget 2006-2007
Jefferson County Annual Budget 2013-2014
Williamson County Departments Budget 2007
Williamson County Departments Budget 2014
City of Houston FY 2007 Adopted Budget
City of Houston FY 2014 Adopted Budget

Under Orlando’s leadership, Harris County Receives Awards for Transparency.

posted in: Awards | 0

orlando-sanchez_gold-leadership-award-1170The Texas Comptroller Leadership Circle – Gold and Platinum Level

Leadership_Circle_Platinum_LogoThis award recognizes local governments who are sharing their books with the public and whose websites provide how its money is being spent in an user friendly format.

The Platinum level is for those who go above the necessary criteria.

The Sunny Award

This award from the Sunshine Review committee was awarded to Harris County in 2010 and 2011.

Harris was among 41 out of 5,000 reviewed government websites to earn an “A” transparency grade.

Sunshine Review’s “Transparency Checklist” awards websites who provide information about budget, meetings and elected officials and high-ranking administrative staff, permits and zoning, audits, contracts, lobbying, public records, and taxes.

The “Checklist” measures what content is available on government websites against what should be provided.


University of Houston Distinguished Alumnus

The University of Houston honored Orlando Sanchez with its Distinguished Alumni Award. The University recognized his service as an active alumnus, former Houston City Council Member, Harris County Treasurer and important community leader. The Distinguished Alumni Award is given to individuals whose professional accomplishments have brought credit to the university.

Support Orlando

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How can I support Orlando?

  • Orlando Sanchez Campaign PO Box 130853 Houston, Texas 77219-0853 or call (832) 521-1962
 

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CONTACT

Po Box 130853

Houston TX 77219 – 0853

Phone: (832) 521-1962

E-mail: info@orlandosanchez.com

A Life in Service to Country and Community

posted in: Biography | 0

Elected in November of 2006, Harris County Treasurer Orlando Sanchez, the first immigrant to be chosen county-wide by the voters for a non-judicial office, oversees Harris County’s multiple bank accounts, pays the county’s expenses and is an independent set of eyes in overseeing spending of county taxpayer dollars.

Sanchez came to Houston in 1962 when his father was hired by former Harris County Judge Roy Hofheinz to be one of two Spanish announcers for the Colt 45s Baseball Club and then the Houston Astros. Sanchez grew up in southwest Houston and graduated from Bellaire High School before joining the U.S. Air Force in 1976. After his tour he enlisted in the 147th Fighter Interceptor Group of the Texas Air National Guard at the then-named Ellington Field.

He graduated cum laude from the University of Houston with a degree in political science and embarked on a career as a public servant, first as a three-term Houston City Council member and then as Harris County Treasurer. Orlando was named the University of Houston’s College of Social Sciences Distinguished Alumnus. Orlando also sits on the Harris County Bail Bonds Board, is a member of the Board of Directors of Capital Bank, a life member of the Houston Livestock Show and Rodeo, the 100 Club of Houston and is a former advisory member of the University of Houston Law School Foundation and current advisory member of Volunteer Interfaith Caregivers-Southwest (VIC-SW), an organization that provides free one-on-one assistance to the frail and elderly in southwest Houston through a network of volunteers who provide services. In addition, he is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and British–American Fellow.

In 1995 Orlando was elected to serve as a member of the Houston City Council. He was the first Latino immigrant elected to a city-wide position in Houston. He served three terms and helped his colleagues pass the first property tax cut in decades. Orlando also chaired the city’s International Trade Committee, the Legislative Affairs Committee and chaired the Cellular Tower Working Committee.

He has served on the Texas Attorney General’s Municipal Advisory Committee and was appointed to the U.S. Senate Task Force on Hispanic Affairs.

Orlando has one daughter, Aubrie, who graduated from Boston University in 2014.